Measuring Engineering Faculty Views about Benefits and Costs of Using Student-Centered Strategies

Eugene Judson, Lydia Ross, James Middleton, Stephen Krause

Abstract


Dispositions of 286 engineering faculty members were assessed to determine views about three student-centered classroom strategies and how frequently faculty used those strategies. The student-centered classroom strategies examined were: using formative feedback to adjust instruction, integrating real-world applications, and promoting student-to-student discussions during formal class time. The Value, Expectancy, and Cost of Testing Educational Reforms Survey (VECTERS), based on expectancy theory, was designed, tested, and validated for this purpose. Results indicate using strategies, such as formative feedback, are significantly tied to perceived benefits and expectation of success. Using student-centered strategies is inversely related to the perceived cost of implementation – with more frequent users perceiving lower cost of time and materials.

Keywords


Student-centered; expectancy theory; formative feedback; engineering education

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International Journal of Engineering Pedagogy. eISSN: 2192-4880
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