Integrating MOOC and Flipped Classroom Practice in a Traditional Undergraduate Course: Students’ Experience and Perceptions

Yan Li, Muhua Zhang, Curtis J. Bonk, Niki Guo

Abstract


The purpose of this experimental study was to redesign a traditional undergraduate course by integrating MOOC content and flipped classroom practice and to see its effectiveness through students’ experience and perceptions. The course named “Internet and Distance Education” was taught in Winter Semester, 2013 at the Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, China to 15 undergraduate students majoring in education. E-learner satisfaction surveys found that students were generally satisfied with many aspects of the redesigned course, including instructor response timeliness, instructor attitude toward the technology, e-learning course flexibility, technology quality, Internet quality, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and perceived e-learner satisfaction, while learner perceived interaction with others was not so satisfactory. Based on the findings, several suggestions to improve the course design are offered.

Keywords


Massive open online course (MOOC); flipped classroom; e-learning satisfaction; perceptions

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International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning. ISSN: 1863-0383
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